Category Archives: Uncategorized

Vintage bikes for sale

I have two bikes for sale. Check out the pictures and read the descriptions, and I’ll be happy to answer any questions you might have. I’ll have a number of other bikes for sale once I get them ready to go; like a Specialized FSR, Kona Caldera, Nakamura city bike, and a nifty Glider townie.

P10505261991 Rocky Mountain Stratos, aluminium frame made in Japan. I think it’s a 19.5″ frame.

 

 

P1050525Stock parts on it were Shimano DX, but there’s some nice upgrades like Shimano XT hubs on Araya rims, and Dia-Compe SS-7 brake levers.

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Counterfeit eBay parts?

It’s always been a dream of mine to build a bike entirely out the CNC machined, anodized parts that you can buy on eBay.  It’s ridiculous I know, but I really want to know how good these parts are. They’re often the cheapest options for new parts, so it’s very hard to resist.

Of course, you risk not being cool if you run these parts. The other guys on your ride are probably not going to be impressed by the Selcof stem on your bike, like they would a Thomson. They might even make fun of you!

I ride by myself though, so I really don’t care about this.

Trek 4500

Trek 4500

My most recent restoration project requires a seatpost. Of course, restoration is not the right term for what I’m doing. Restoration is what you do to a 30 year old Ritchey or Yeti. I have a ’03 Trek 4500.

Nobody restores a 10 year old Trek. Flipping is what I’m doing here.

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Visiting bike shops

If you’re not aware of this website yet, I highly recommend you check out Velominati.  If you have any interest in bike racing, current or historical, you’ll enjoy this site.  And what they’re most famous for, is The Rules.

I’m quite certain The Rules are mean to be tongue-in-cheek to some degree.  But, there are some rules that I take to heart.  Specifically, Rule #4;

It is, absolutely, without question, unequivocally, about the bike.

They’ve just described me here.

So, just about any time I ride my bike to a shop, I take some time to consider which bike I should ride.  Specifically; which bike will reflect best on the type of cycling enthusiast I am.  Now I used to work in a shop, and I can tell you, we were snobs.  There’s just no way around this – day after day of fixing Treks and Norcos leaves you with very high standards for what a cool bike is.

In four years at Redbike, there was really only one time that a bike brought the shop to a halt.  A Calfee carbon singlespeed, custom built with no clear coat over the tubes. It looked like it was made from pencil lead, and I still don’t know what kind of brakes it had – I’ve never seen another set like the ones on that bike.

Now, I needed some part, so I figured I’d hit Pedalhead on my way home from work.  If Redbike wasn’t my shop, Pedalhead definitely would be – they’ve been around since 1996, and they’re just solid guys.

Dekerf Team ST

Dekerf Team ST

I could have taken my Bridgestone, or maybe my Vitus road bike, but I figured what would make the best impression, was my Dekerf. After I bought whatever I was there to buy, the owner, Chris, and I started talking bikes, and he asked what I was riding.  He looked it over, and seemed to be impressed.

When he mentioned the old RaceFace Turbine cranks, I pointed out that they were 180mm Turbine cranks.  He looks at me with a big smile and says; “You’re a total bike nerd aren’t you?”

Damn straight.

 

 

 

Vintage wheel size?

I was chatting with my neighbour the other day, and he made a comment that was really innocuous at the time, but when I thought about it really quite telling about the state of the industry.

He’s a rider too I should mention – has a Giant enduro-type bike from a couple years ago.

We were discussing the end of the 26″ wheel.  I mentioned that I have a set of Mavic XC717 rims, and they’re probably the last high-quality, rim brake compatible, 26″ rims made.  He said; “Soon there won’t be any good 26″ stuff left for us.”

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